BronzeCo.

Perfect Home

image

image

image

image

image

New York based artist and Seoul, South Korea expatriot Do Ho Suh has often times with his work inspired viewers to look outside of themselves at a larger picture. However, his show “Perfect Home”, which just finished a four month stint at the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa, Japan tells a much more personal story. These pieces, constructed out of steel armatures and translucent nylon fabric are recreations of the homes that he has lived, loved, lost, failed, and flourished in. The result of these constructions is nothing short of awe inspiring; the semi-transparent spaces he creates indicate an interesting intention. The artist becomes as translucent as the works themselves. This being said, no wall or stair is transparent, as no person truly is.

image

    Sharing with people the spaces that he cared for provides viewers with an intimate view of one level of his personal life, but without sharing so much detail that their story is obvious. We are not defined by where we live; we create the definitions of the spaces we choose to occupy by what we do in them.

(Source: bronzeco.com)


Japanese Artist Motoi Yamamoto Creates Immense Salt Installations →

Every once and a while it takes an artist like Motoi Yamamoto to remind you how powerful it is to be human and to have the relationships that we often take for granted. Using salt as media through association with Japanese funereal culture, the artist honors and mourns the loss of his sister through his incredibly intricate labyrinthian works. After the end of each show, the salt from each piece is collected and then released in a cathartically into the ocean.


We are always looking to enhance the look of your space with our sculpture. Stop by BronzeCo and see what fantastic accent you can find for your home or office!


Had a fun time this weekend at the Donald Judd/Dan Flavin show at David Zwirner Gallery. The minimalist works were simply that; devoid of explanation but still uniquely intriguing.

(Source: bronzeco.com)


Richard Artschwager dies at age 89.

     After a long life and serendipitous late blooming as a professional artist, conceptual painter and sculptor Richard Artschwager passed away from a stroke at age 89.

     Artschwager was known for his ambiguous style, which adapted to and had a hand in influencing many movements in modern art, including minimalism, pop art, and mid-century modernism. He was always at heart a conceptual artist; his highly graphic pieces often incited a dialogue through their simplicity. He’s quoted by the New York Times saying, “Sculpture is for the touch, painting is for the eye. I wanted to make a sculpture for the eye and a painting for the touch.”

     The Whitney Museum just closed a major retrospective of his work, that was correlated with an installation of one of his longest running series, “blps” (pronounced blips), on the High Line in New York’s Meat Packing District. The simple, graphic blocks were stenciled, painted and stickered to areas he wanted to draw your attention to. 

     Artschwager had an early interest in art, however put it aside to support his family as a baby photographer in his twenties and thirties. His first solo show was in 1965 at Leo Casteli Gallery at age 42; he quickly gained momentum and became a major player in art and design history. After some time establishing himself, he was represented by Gagosian Gallery until his death.

     This is indeed unfortunate news, however one cannot discount that Richard Artschwager lived a unique and fulfilling life, and proved that it is never too late to pursue a dream.